Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Pretty purple plants in the pasture

There is a preponderance of this pretty purple plant in the pasture this year.

 

 I think it's wild verbena.



The online plant guide describes it as being able to "tolerate a wide range of growing conditions,
especially dry, infertile soils and disturbed sites where the topsoil has been interrupted." 
Yep, that would be my pasture.


Hank and the herd seem to eat around it, though I occasionally see them chomping on a mouthful.
I suppose that makes them two-eyed, four-legged, flying purple pasture eaters.


 Eighty acres and these two have to argue over a blade of grass.



Have you noticed what's missing from these pictures? Fly masks. 
So far this year, the roll-on fly repellent is keeping the face flies in check.
I've switched to a brand (Absorbine UltraShield) that doesn't attract as much dirt.
No face flies + no more raccoon eyes = happy me.



 I never tire of pictures of Hank's posterior.



I hope you don't either.



18 comments:

  1. Beautiful photography! And.. thanks for the roll-on tip.. I'm going to order some.. as that is a constant nuisance around here too.

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  2. Thank you for sharing pictures of your furred and feathered family (does Wynonna have bristles?) They are a a favourite part of my morning.

    Laurie

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  3. And a fine posterior it is! Gotta try the roll-on ultrashield - thanks for the tip :)

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  4. that last photo I would call "sunset over Hank's south side" ;)

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  5. Love the pictures. Just wish I had skipped the part with flying purple people eater reference, now it's running through my mind... :)
    Steph

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  6. I love Hank's muscles...such a hunk!
    You know I would be picking those flowers if I was there, so pretty

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  7. The pics make the 7MSN herd seem so serene. For the moment at least. Happy you found a good alternative to the hated fly masks. Those fringed things were pretty comical though.

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  8. perhaps the porcine princess would partake of a passel of purple pasture posies if you brought some to her?

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  9. I could look at Hanks butt all day...........................

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  10. Beautiful pictures with pops of purple verbena! Your animals are always photogentic either with their heads or their bottoms. Happy hump day.

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  11. Those are pretty flowers! I'll bet they're all happy that the new fly repellent is working too. Those fly masks must be hot and itchy.

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  12. any angle of Hank is good. he is a gorgeous boy

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  13. It does look like wild verbena. Love the photos and your blog. Have you checked out the blog "Dancing Donkeys"? Her critters are SO like your own! Here is a link if you are interested: http://thedancingdonkey.blogspot.com/2014/05/getting-ready-for-winter.html

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  14. Beautiful pictures of Hank. The flower is known as Dakota Vervain, Pink Vervain, or Verbena. These are the common names for Glandularia bipinnatifida or Verbena bipinnnatifida. Conditions are just right and they are blooming everywhere in New Mexico from late March to October. The Keres puebloan people crushed the leaves and rubbed it on snakebites and a leaf infusion is used as a gargle for sore throats according to "Wildflowers of the Sandia and Manzano Muntains of Central New Mexico" by Larry J. Littlefield and Pearl M. Burns. I will lead a wildflower walk into the Sandia Mountains this Saturday morning. Anyone desiring to come, please meet at the Sandia District Ranger Station in Tijeras by 9AM and we will car pool to the trail. Forest Service wildflower walks on the Sandia and Manzanita Mountains will be held each Saturday through the end of August. Meet by 9AM at the Tijeras Ranger Station.

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  15. An American in Tokyo6/4/14, 9:05 PM

    That last photo is beeeeeeeaaaauuuutiful!!!

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  16. Those shots of Hank are "bootylicious"!! Thanks for the tip on the roll-on, will have to give it a try. :-)

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