Monday, September 4, 2017

The 7MSN I.C.U.


62 comments:

  1. Poor babies! Be sure to take care of yourself while you take care of them. I'm glad you explained about the coal tar medication. At first I thought all that black stuff was scabbing or blood. It may look horrible but at least it's supposed to be there.

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  2. Oh no! Poor sweet souls! Prayers for very speedy recoveries for Lucy and George, and hopefully some respite for you.

    Maggy

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  3. This breaks my heart. I can't take it when fur babies don't feel good...
    So thankful they have you to take such good care of them...
    You are such a good mama...
    Praying for healing for them, strength for all, and cooler weather soon.

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  4. I've never heard of dryland distempter. Will have to look that one up. Poor babies. They have the best care possible with you so they will come through with flying colors. Paco says they need treats to feel better... ;)

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  5. Sorry, but I can't believe your vet would consider Dex. Known to cause founder. I feel so sorry for your and your kids. I have a friend that got a 'bra' for his horse with the same type of allergy. Looks funny, but does protect. The only downside is that Alan would destroy it while George was wearing it. Sending bunches of healing light your way...blessed be

    Emily in NC

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  6. I'm trying to remember a time when any of the donkeys were sick and I can't. Do you think it might be related to the weather/climate. I'm always ready to blame climate change for any anomaly.
    Is here pain medication for them? You're the best Mom Carson.

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    1. The bacteria that causes dryland distemper (aka pigeon fever but it has nothing to do with pigeons) lives in the soil. From what I've been reading, it seems to be becoming more common as the west becomes more dry. Lucy and George are getting pain meds every day.

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    2. I'm pretty sure Lucy rolled in the cactus to alleviate the allergy because Allergy drives you nuts. I can swear it, being allergic myself and having a cat with allergy problems.

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  7. Northern AB gal9/4/17, 7:07 AM

    I agree with everything Anonymous said, so hard to see animals suffering but so glad they have you. I also have never heard of dryland distemper - google here we come!

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  8. Poor sweeties (you too)! Heartbreaking to see you Lucy walk with such pain. I've never heard of any of those issues. I'm hoping for quick recoveries and an end to the flies. Thanks for the explanations though.

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  9. Wonderful temporary pain support for laminitis is called the lily pad. It's a strange looking rubber pad with frog support that you just duck tape over the sole of the foot. Big D's tack and Vet Supply - bigdweb.com item #5131. Might want to check it out, has been fantastic for our old gelding. Good Luck in the ICU! These critters do make our lives complete --- and complicated sometimes!

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    1. George's feet seem much less sore this morning, so with any luck, I won't be needing to strap lily pads to his feet, but thanks for the idea.

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  10. Oh gosh. Thank God they have you! It sounds like the fault of the summer that never ends, hoping for quick (too late for that) healing. Aunt Jean

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  11. Anne Boleyn9/4/17, 7:28 AM

    This just breaks my heart! I want to be there to help, even if it's just to fix the drinks! XO!

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    1. If this keeps up, I may need to install a wine cooler in the feed room.

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    2. Sounds like a great idea...even if they're symptom free!

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  12. Feel better everyday Lucy and George. And, Alan, stay well.

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  13. Oh, no - we have the same rule here - only one at a time! But sometimes they break it. They're lucky to have such a conscientious, caring mom/nurse and you are lucky to have such sweet donkeys who cooperate with treatment. Hang in there! Rafer Johnson and Redford have sometimes had a little bit of the chest thing and what has worked for us is putting them on spiraling, chondroitin, and ground flax starting in early spring and keeping them on it into the summer months. For George's foot soreness and founder, ecir.org has a host of things you can do to help make him more comfortable. Sometimes in a pinch they recommend you duct tape foam rubber pads to the bottom of the hooves to give some relief. Often you can find this in a home supply store in the form of a floor mat - I think the most common one folks have found is a child's multi-colored alphabet puzzle mat that seems to be in most of these type stores. You then cut out hoof shapes and will have the remainder to keep in your emergency kit for the hopefully never reoccurrence! They have a lot of experience on the site with dex-induced laminitis as it is often used when doing the test to dx insulin resistance. There are other ways to make the dx and they now recommend the protocol that avoids the Dex. Sending hugs to all.

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    1. Drat autocorrect and my lack of proofreading - spiralina - not spiraling!!

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    2. I'm going to remember your spring skin treatment for next year. I knew exactly what you meant by "spiraling," though. Lyle loved the stuff, but it gave him green lips (http://www.the7msnranch.com/2008/04/story-of-lyle-part-3.html).

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  14. Oh, I am so sorry that Lucy and George are ailing. Best wishes for a speedy recovery....for all of you!

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  15. Sending good thoughts that everyone feel good again asap!

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  16. Michelle from Vancouver9/4/17, 9:34 AM

    Omg, poor babies. Lucy looks in so much pain it breaks my heart. Are you getting any sleep? I think you need to have a family meeting and review the rule ....only one sick family member at a time!!

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    1. I'm getting plenty of sleep - thanks for checking! I can see them both from the bed in the sunroom, which certainly helps.

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    2. You could install a hamack between them and Johnny!

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  17. lucky those sweeties have such a good mama

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  18. So hard when the kiddos are sick. Love that Alan came in and went straight for George forehead to forehead. So normal and soothing for them both. Sending all the support vibes for all of you.

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  19. I love that you have a spreadsheet to track their medications, etc! They are in good hands with you. Praying they heal soon. Maybe while you are hanging out with them you can make a Donkey ICU sign. ;)

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  20. Check out feeding spirulina to George for his allergies, it has been shown to help a great deal. Also, omega 3's and vit. E. I like Omega Horseshine, it can have an amazing effect for this kind of skin allergy. Getting him on a tightly balanced mineral can also help tremendously. Tessa used to get terrible rashes every year, but a few changes to her diet has cured them completely. If you would like help with this, I would be happy to help, I have a degree in eq. science and I am a certified equine nutritionist and I've spent the last 6 years trying to figure out donkey diets:)

    http://forageplustalk.co.uk/why-feed-spirulina-to-horses/

    Even if George is walking better today, I would also suggest that you pad his feet. He needs sole support to help prevent coffin bone rotation. I can give you some suggestions based on what you have on hand. Feel free to get in touch if I can help in any way. aerissana@gmail.com

    I've been seeing more and more reports of pigeon fever, it sounds very nasty. Good luck to everybody and I hope they are all feeling better soon.

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    1. Thanks, Kris. I'm off to check out the Omega Horseshine.

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  21. Oh poor Lucy and George! Lucky they have an excellent ICU nurse on hand 24/7.

    There is ichthammol coating several of my fingertips which are trying to expel hay needles at the moment. I always keep it on hand for (equine) abscess treatment - it's the best drawing salve. Hope the patient's recovery is speedy and comfortable.

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  22. My heart just breaks for both poor patients! And for Alan, who has to do without his besties. It's awful to see them so miserable, but you're a very good ICU nurse; they couldn't be in better hands. Sweet Alan, who isn't better for a face-to-face with a good pal? That was a super get-well card! Hope some of the suggestions here, or others, work the required magic. Hugs & donkey kisses from here to all 4 of you.

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  23. Oh my gosh. Poor them and poor you. Hope it's all better soon

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  24. The poor little guys! We just had a few weeks of spreadsheet multiple medication schedules, only ours were human-related (in addition to the usual daily geriatric dog meds). All is well now, as it will be with your family, but it's very unnerving to go from healthy to not-healthy so quickly.

    You are a far more patient nurse than I could ever hope to be.

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  25. Oh poor Lucy and George...and you. Never had to deal with pigeon fever with my guys. But several of my friends have. It's a pain. Very common in southern California as well as AZ. The black salve is fantastic as a drawing agent. works for hoof abscesses and splinters too. I know you'll take good care of the kids! Wishing them a speedy recovery!

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  26. i am so sorry to hear they (and you) are suffering. Hoping they get well soon.

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  27. An American in Tokyo9/4/17, 6:15 PM

    I'm sorry to hear about George and Lucy, but George's nose flares crack me up!!
    And him telling Alan off, that was interesting!

    I hope Lucy and George feel better soon, poor things!

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  28. Awwww....... Poor babies..... And poor you. Sending lots of healing thoughts and hugs!

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  29. Will he stand for icing his feet? My older guy (QH) seems to have a spring flare each year even though he's essentially drylotted. He's gotten quite tolerant of standing in feed pan filled with ice for short intervals.

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    1. I tried that...as sore as George was, there was no standing still in a feed pan of water. He's on Pentoxifylline though, which is supposed to affect the blood cells in his feet the same way that the cold water does.

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    2. if not standing in it, you may roll icy wet towels on top of his hooves, if of any help...

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  30. Lucy and George have the best nurse in the world. Hope they both start feeling better soon. It's heartbreaking to think of those babies in pain but I know you're doing everything possible to keep them comfortable. Looking forward to your updates Nurse Carson.

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  31. Oh man I feel so bad for you and your babies. I hope they are all better soon.

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  32. Is it completely crazy that I am worried about your donkeys today?? Praying everyone is healing!! Lisa G in TN

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    1. Bless your heart. George is better, Lucy is not. I'll try to post a real update tomorrow.

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    2. Ok..had to laugh, in the south, "bless your heart" means "you are as dumb as a rock". Looking forward to a good report tomorrow. Lisa G in TN

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    3. Call me embarrassed. I'm a Yankee obviously. No time tonight to write a post for tomorrow, which would only be worrisome to all. It's a waiting game with Lucy, waiting for the abcess the vet believes will eventually surface, to surface. Ugh.

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    4. I'm from the south and many of us do say "bless your heart" with sincerity, not meaning anything but thank you so much. I suspect it depends on where in the south one grows up and how it was used in close circles of family/friends. In my circle if someone wanted to say you are dumb as a rock they would just say that outright! LOL.

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    5. "Bless your heart" goes both ways in my experience. But usually the negative version is "bless his heart" or "bless her heart" because we southerners are often too passive aggressive to use the less than kind version to someone's face. :D

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  33. Oh, poor babies (all three of you!) Do you suppose it would give them some foot relief to have big rubber mats to stand on? I hope the weather cools down soon for you all.

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    1. Part of each pen has rubber stall mats - Lucy stands on hers, George prefers to stand in the soft dirt. To each his own I guess.

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  34. This is from Dr. Kellon's magazine. She is the expert on equine nutrition. May help????

    Hives are a fairly common allergic manifestation that are often recurrent and in some cases even chronic. Many of you know I have been suggesting chondroitin sulfate, 2500 to 5000 mg per 500 lb, twice a day, for skin allergies. That is based on these studies:

    http://www.jbc.org/content/281/29/19872.long
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1572430/

    It works pretty well but there may be a better solution. Dr. Elizabeth Herbert from Australia reports she has used injectable Pentosan polysulfate (Pentosan EQ) with dramatic results. She became interested in it after seeing pentosan used topically for human nasal allergy and when clients reported to her they had horses whose hives disappeared after a Pentosan injection.

    Pentosan is a polysulfated glycosaminoglycan similar to Adequan and used for arthritis. For hives, the same dosage is used – 3 mg/kg intramuscularly. It is repeated if or when the hives recur.

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    1. Very interesting. Thanks so much for the links!

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  35. Pobrecitos! You are such a good nurse and friend to your babies. Glad Alan has not been affected. Yes to the wine cooler installation!

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  36. Wishes and thoughts of healing from all your friends at Bee Haven Acres! Hope George and Lucy are better real soon!,,

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  37. Oh, this just makes me sad! Such good donkeys. Prayers that they are both feeling better soon.

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  38. Holy shit, Carson - I'm so sorry you all are having to go through this!! I've been so absorbed with the heat and wildfire drama up here, I didn't even realize you had so much going on. I'm worried!! Watching Lucy walk in her stall just before Alan comes in breaks my heart. It looks like she's in such pain. :-( I know you are doing everything right and only the best for everyone - but I hope you are doing ok...I know how the worry can take its toll. Thinking of you guys and hoping for no more pain and a speedy recovery for sweet Lucy and George.

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  39. I feel so bad for you and your babies. Prayers that everyone heals quickly. You are an amazing donkey mama!

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  40. we're still crossing our paws for Lucy!

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  41. Hoping everyone is better this day.

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  42. I know nothing about horse but a lot about allergy. if Lucy is not showing relief, the medicine is not working, relief should be instantaneous when speaking about allergy (I am not speaking about healing but just relief). to my knowledge, allergy is treated starting with a blood test but I'am no doctor.

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  43. Oh dear, I am just now catching up on your blog. I've dealt with dryland, allergies and founder with my horse. I resorted to allergy testing and injections and daily Platinum Skin and Allergy. It's been under control for more than 3 years. And with founder, a sand pen is the best for recovery. It just takes time. Soft Ride Boots were so helpful because they change the angle and keep the pressure off. Thinking good thoughts for recovery.

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