Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Some guests dropped in for lunch

No matter how busy my workday might be, I always try to step away from the keyboard at lunchtime
to do a few chores in the barn and check in with the herd. I usually don't take my camera 
because the light at high noon is too harsh, but I had it with me yesterday on a whim.

Good thing. We had guests for lunch.



We watched them for awhile...



...and I tried to get as close as I could without scaring them off.



Alan doesn't understand pronghorns any better than I do.



Their legs look too skinny to hold them up, their heads are out of proportion to their bodies, 
and their bright white butts make them an easy target for hunters.

Just as the big buck walked off, another pair of guests dropped by. 
I can't find them in my New Mexico range guide to be able to tell you what they are:


Lunchtime in the middle of nowhere ... sure beats eating a sandwich in the company cafeteria.



18 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing your lunchtime photos just in time for my lunchtime in the office. Wish I had such interesting guests.

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  2. Wow, you really got some good pictures. I'm surprised you could sneak up so close without them taking off. Better than the cafeteria any day for sure.

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  3. IMO I think that plane is another overpriced government project eh! I would rather have lunch at your work place than mine ;p

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  4. I don't understand how anyone can kill anything for 'sport'. If you're starving and have to eat, that's one thing...but for 'fun'? I so appreciate your respect for nature, and that we get to enjoy it via your beautiful images. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. Anne Boleyn9/18/12, 6:56 AM

    Alan is so shiny! (I know that's not the point of this post but I just had to mention it.)

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  6. The airplane is an Osprey. There are several based at Kirkland AFB in Albuquerque.

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  7. It is reported that the pronghorn can jump higher than the average house. The question remains, how high can the average house jump? :)
    Don't know what kind of bird that is in your last pic.

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  8. Maybe that was the Goggle Earth plane....checking out "your street". hehehehe
    I would never get a thing done except be a viewer at your place. Always some something going on in the middle of nowhere. You are a fortunate one. OmaLinda

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  9. Pronghorns are beautiful, amazing you got that close for pictures. Yes much more interesting than lunch in the company cafeteria, hope you find an identity for that strange looking bird.

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  10. What an interesting lunch break! The wild turkeys here and an occasional Apache or Lifeflight from Vanderbilt are about it in mid-TN.
    Then, I was really impressed when "onhazer's" correct identification sent me googling for "USAF Osprey aircraft". That's quite a plane/helicopter!

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  11. Those are awesome shots of the pronghorns. They were really close! It's probably best that the other guest just kept moving through to the lunch counter.

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  12. Nice shots, but the one of Alan's mane is my fave- reminds me of the hairdo of one of the 3 Stooges. And I'm NOT saying that Alan is a Stooge!

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  13. awww I agree, that lunch in the country is ALWAYS better than in town :) loved seeing the guests you had for lunchtime ;) it's raining here and makes me sleepy ...later jeanne in SC

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  14. I'm so glad you had your camera! The pronghorns are every bit as impressive as that $60 million bird. Even George and Alan seem to be in awe. What a nice lunch break for you.

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  15. On the days I telecommute, I always take my lunch break at the barn -- that's the benefit of working at home, right?

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  16. Pronghorn are built for speed. They can reach a speed of 60mph and can cruise at 45mph for several miles. Pronghorn evolved with the north american chetah... which if you haven't noticed are no longer around. Today pronghorn have no natural wild predators. They out run them all. Though when first born, fawns are vulnerable to coyotes because the wee ones stay put in one place when mom goes off to graze. Two week old fawns can outrun a coyote. Pronghorn avoid jumping fences because of their very very thin leg bones which are susceptible to breaking when landing on the other side. They opt for crawling under barbwire fences. CeeCee may have been thinking of elk. Eight foot fences are needed to keep elk out of the hay. Okay... that's probably more than y'all wanted to know, but I find pronghorn fascinating and beautiful.

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  17. Not probably more than I wanted to know,mtlion ! They are fascinating creatures and you answered many of my questions !

    Great photos, Carson !

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