Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Building the Chicken Palace, part 2

Welcome to our weekly show-and-tell session on the Chicken Palace. Slow and steady progress was made over the weekend. I've yet to make a second trip to Home Depot, and I've still got 10 fingers. If those aren't measures of success, then I don't know what is.

Much of Saturday was spent measuring and sawing and ignoring the warning labels on the HardiePanel siding, which of course I didn't read until all the cuts were made. "James Hardie® products contain respirable crystalline silica and other materials known to the State of California to cause cancer...FAILURE TO ADHERE TO OUR WARNINGS, MSDS, AND INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS MAY LEAD TO SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH." Whatever. Since the materials are not known to the State of New Mexico to be harmful, I assumed I was safe. I was just so happy to have figured out a way to keep the cut pieces of siding from falling onto my toes that I didn't care too much about the dust I was inhaling.



The base that I built last weekend came in ever-so-handy for this weekend's work, as did Smooch's bag of dog food. She has agreed to fast for the remainder of the project so that I can keep using the 40-pound bag for ballast. KIDDING!


Hank was so sweet. Every time he heard me cuss up a storm, he came running over to check on me. Were it not for the door trim that needed to have mitered corners, cussing would have been kept to a minimum.

You: Why do the doors of a Chicken Palace – that no one except for the chickens will ever see – need to have trim with mitered corners?
Me: Because.


By Sunday night, I think the hard part was over. I had figured out how to cut out the drop down doors and make the nesting boxes, and all the pieces were fitting together. The framework looks a little crooked here, but don't despair. It's just tacked in place for now so that I can visualize and conceptualize and cross my eyes as the work progresses. Once I move the base to its permanent home in the barn, I'll get serious about squaring up the frame. Because the chickens won't be able to lay eggs unless the corners are perfectly square, right? Please tell me I'm right. See what happens when you inhale too much respirable crystalline silica? You worry about such things.

26 comments:

  1. The fact you still have all your digits AND you're sober..well..that's a WIN right there.
    I'm sure it will be fabulous. The chickens will appreciate fine craftsmanship.

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  2. Looking good! Please make sure the overall height is less than the height of your garage door opening.
    Signed,
    The Voice of Experience

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  3. Of course mitered corners are important. And true and straight sides. You don't want the chickens to start listing to one side when they walk.

    And who knows what the eggs would look like?!

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  4. What's a mitered corner???

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  5. Maybe the chickens could help you with the corners? Just sayin'; they should do some of the work!!!

    You are something, lady!!!

    Nancy, a non-builder in Iowa

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  6. Nancy in NC9/13/11, 7:32 AM

    Very impressive! You go girl!

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  7. Nothing else on the ranch is done half-baked (read: Beverly Hillbilly style), why start with the Pollo Palacio?

    It looks wonderful! I'm sure Smooch would gladly eat a little cat food while her dog food is being used as ballast. :)

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  8. Lookin' good!! All palaces have to have door trim and mitered corners. It wouldn't be a palace without them. :) The girls are going to think you are Queen when they see the finished product.

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  9. You and Hank are my heroes!

    Can't wait to see the final product, and I bet that the chickens will love their winter palace.

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  10. Your talents seem endless! It will be amazing and the chickens will LOVE it.

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  11. This is better than saturday night at the movies ;-) Very happy that all fingers are still accounted for....waddabout yer toes?

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  12. Wow, that's a very enthusiastic project. I'm sure it will be absolutely beautiful when it's complete and the new tenants will love their new home. Love all the editorial comments on the photos. *smile*

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  13. Glad to hear you still have all your fingers and toes. I would be missing a few. :) Oh that Hank! He's a keeper.

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  14. Have you chosen the paint colors yet?
    Girls like pink I think...just a thought. Don't mean to get ahead of the game. You're doin' great. Keep going it's going to be fabulous.
    Best always, Sandra

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  15. Three words: Power Mitre Saw!

    Mine has been the absolute best investment I have ever made and is my favourite tool! You can get basic ones for about $100 at home depot, on sale. Mine's a Dewalt which I bought for about $200 five years ago.

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  16. I need you to come over to my place. My partner dis-assembled our porch weeks ago and it's still lying in pieces scattered around the yard. Seeing how organized and skilled you are, I figure you can put it back together in no time! Western Oregon is beautiful this time of year....You could even bring Smooch. :)

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  17. I am enjoying the building of your chicken house, and since I want to have some chickens, I will be learning a lot, so "I" can build my chicken house! Love your blog, and it is always a bright spot in my day! THANK YOU!

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  18. Jean beat me to it! I was going to say it was time for a compound miter saw, too. Those little boxes just don't hack it--or maybe, they do just hack it, and not always where you want it to be hacked.
    As for colors: I think the "pollo palcio" (I like that, CeeCee) should have a definite fiesta vibe going, golds, and reds, and turquiose. Just sayin'.

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  19. Looks like its going to be pretty big, how are you going to get it out to the chicken yard? Party! Perfect excuse to have friends over to lift and tote and drink! And save yourself a bit of hassle, get some cheap folding sawhorses, I got some at Walmart that are great. And some face masks, protect your lungs.
    You and Hank can look like masked bandits together...

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  20. Can you do a tutorial on mitered corners? That's one thing I can't get right!

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  21. I can't wait to see the finished project! And how are you going to transport it to the barn... piece by piece and put it back together? I am truly in awe.

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  22. And when you're finished, Harry and Gunny need an upgrade to their donkey shelter. They don't care so much about craftsmanship and they are happy to help you with the tools, buckets, etc. The chicken inspectors will be on the job in case you miss any details. AND you can take fabulous photos here on the Central Coast! Sounds fun, huh?

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  23. you still da woman.... I'm impressed; glad you got Hank checking in on you!!

    PS: thanks for not sharing the whole baby swallow saga in pictures. I understand about the circle of life and nature and suff but I don't like to see it played out :) But seriously, a baby swallow????

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  24. PS: oh and I can answer that question about needing the doors of the Chicken Palace mitered..... not just "because" but because you are not one to turn down a challenge.... that's why! and that is one of the many things that amazes me about you and your life in the middle of nowhere!!!!

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  25. Miters are the bane of jr carpenters everywhere. it's the f.stop of carpentry.

    When is the stained glass going in?

    And, have you heard of this: http://fccooptour.blogspot.com/

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  26. HardiePanel board - hmmm, should be basically fireproof in the event of a wildfire, but unfortunately, I think the chickens will be well-roasted. My house is paneled with HardiePanel, be sure to use no nails (they will crack the cementized board), only screws (but I guess you know that, although the builders of my house did not).

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