Wednesday, August 17, 2016

I'm SO glad I asked

My head is still spinning from your relocation ideas yesterday.
I knew you all would come through for me!
The comments on yesterday's post will stay open forever, so if you think 
of any other places worth considering for The 7MSN Ranch 2.0,
keep chiming in. 

In the meantime, I've mapped the possibilities so far.
(click on the map if it's too small to read)


I'll be researching every single one and, knowing me, will post regular updates
on the decision-making process because you know this is all I'm going to be
thinking about for the coming months. 

Just think...once we get the location figured out, 
we can start working on house plans! 
I'm thinking of this as "retirement by committee."
Couldn't do it without you – thanks!


45 comments:

  1. Pahrump is way too hot!

    The Hill Country of TX is definitely a good possibility.

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  2. Anne Boleyn8/17/16, 6:02 AM

    I vote for Middlebrook VA in the options so far! And you'd be close to Justina and Don (and me). XO

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    1. Wouldn't it be cool to just pop over to your place for coffee?

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  3. I hate to make changes on your map, but have you considered staying in NM and moving closer to a town? My brother lived near Socorro, NM for a couple of years, and though I didn't spend a lot of time there, I remember riding a bike into town every day. There was a beautiful, old town square and an adobe catholic church that dated from the 1700's. He almost couldn't see his neighbors, had plenty of room for horses or cattle, and had a view of two beautiful mountains from his front door.

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    1. Staying in NM is always a possibility but the ongoing drought always looms in the back of my mind.

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    2. what about investing in a big underground cistern, with the heavy rains you get ssometimes, it would be a good solution

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  4. Although I haven't spent much time in Utah, it's a beautiful state with, I believe, low taxes.

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  5. Montana! So much to choose from! The western part of the state has mountains, the eastern part of the state flatter and more high desert like. The central part of the state some of each. I'm 50 miles north of Billings and have rugged bluffs and river bottom and everything in between. Sometimes it's hot and sometimes it's cold and lots of the time it's in between.I have pine trees and cactus and magnificent skys.

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    1. I was hoping there was a knowledgeable Montanan out there reading this. Another dot for my map!

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    2. I lived in NW Montana for several years--Whitefish. Considered the "banana belt". But they do get some serious snow there! As in over the top of the fence line...

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  6. As a native Texan, now living in Tennessee, I can attest that the 3 Texas locations are lovely, however they are subject to drought and flash flooding. Of course, it's the heart of bluebonnet country, so that and Blue Bell Ice Cream cancel out Mother Nature's deficiencies!

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    1. Drought and flash flooding...you're bursting my bubble. Need ice cream.

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    2. Oh, and I have pictures of the flash floods from my friend whose family has a place in Kerrville. It is on a fantastic collective ranch. Lots of great people and a huge retired community. Just hotter than hellfire in the summer and flash flooding. No snow, though. And no Justina and Don.

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  7. Hahaha! I love that Portugal is on the map!! :-)

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    1. I am all excited by your adventure! having moved A LOT in my life, I would advice (?) or just say that you could do more homework on the subject before checking on locations. You may not like the idea but I would grab a fresh nice little notebook and write down some lists: the one you propose is the top ideal one. the next one list to make could be: what is the most important point for me if I coud only have one fulfilled? I know for eg that a friend around would be a higher point for me on that list than any rain issue (that is just me). and go on with your thinking, right everything down, if not lists, some ideas. hope you understand what I mean (because I am thinking in French)!

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  8. So much fun to see the visual. I think you should add Northern Nevada to your list. Great little towns not far from Reno. As we get older, access to good healthcare is a must. Northern Nevada has 4 Seasons and is beautiful. If you want green pasture, then I would put Oregon and Washington high on the list. Good luck and can't wait to see what you decide. Betsy

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    1. Any northern Nevado towns in particular?

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    2. I have a friend who retired from MN to Smith Valley, NV. They love it . Nice acreage and barn for their horses. Reno airport is not far. Minden, Gardnerville and Carson City are the nearest towns. Of course, Tahoe is close too. Beautiful area not too different from where you are now. High desert valley surrounded by nearby mountains, lots of sage instead of cactus.

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  9. So excited to see a pin in NC! In our area we are rich with good hay, good mobile equine vet care (with a few specializing in donkeys!), and super feed stores. I hope you know that if you want to come check things out, November Hill will be your base camp and I'll be happy to show you around. I think the photographer in you would LOVE our state. For some landscape photography check out my husband's site, lightskyland.com and for animals photos check out daughter's, kenziecromer.com. Make sure to go into the galleries! This will be fun to share the journey with you and all the critters.

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  10. Montana, especially around Missoula is a place I'd love to live- great recreation and so pretty. Boise Idaho is also good. Medford Oregon is where our kids live and it's gorgeous although getting pricey thanks to a lot of others feeling the same way-- much drier down there.

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  11. I can confirm that Penrose and Canon City, Colorado are great places and we call that area 'the banana belt of CO' since they are a bit lower in elevation and have milder temperatures. Also there is more land for your animals, which I would love to visit one day. I live in Monument, CO which is at an altitude of 7200 and a bit crowded and colder than you'd probably prefer. Good luck on your search and I hope you find the perfect place. P.S. I would live in New Zealand if I had the chance too!

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  12. I'm so glad you asked too, because you have the same criteria as me for where I would like to retire. I've been hanging onto my rental in the Carson Valley in Northern Nevada, because I loved my 20-some years that I lived there, but I didn't like the neighbors, the tourists, the sudden influx of transplants causing traffic and overcrowding in my once small town. It's hard to stay ahead of the crowd. You almost have to locate a small town that isn't on other people's radar yet. That area has drought and wildfire problems, which causes poor air quality in the summer. It can get blizzards in the winter. My longest white winter lasted from October through June. When I was living there, we did not experience four seasons, but just winter and construction. I'm hoping all of that has changed in the four years I've been gone.

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  13. Northern AB gal8/17/16, 12:42 PM

    Since a lot of us live vicariously through your blog :), this process is going to be so much fun. Nice to see Montana, also Idaho, chiming in. Would love to see the spreadsheet that you develop for this project, lol. Perhaps we could get started on house plans, one level?; min. sq. ft?; at least 3 bedrooms and a couple of bathrooms, cause you know you are going to have company, haha.

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    1. Ha! You know me so well. I was just contemplating what my column headers were going to be on the spreadsheet while out walking Smooch.

      One level, around 1,000 sq ft, 2 bedrooms, each with a bathroom... I'm going to try to set up some sort of shared board on Pinterest where we can park our ideas..

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    2. Mid Century Modern....love those built-ins. Lots of windows to enjoy those beautiful skies.

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    3. or a square house with central patio, fountain and gallery around

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  14. Yippee.....New Zealand made the first cut! We look forward to continuing to fight for our place on THE MAPπŸ˜€ Heather

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  15. An American in Tokyo8/17/16, 5:52 PM

    This is going to be so much fun!!! =D

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  16. Re: the New Zealand suggestions. It is a beautiful, well run country with nice people and low crime. However, they don't make it easy to retire there from another country. The last time I checked, a person wanting to relocate there had to invest at least $550,000 in New Zealand, and that amount could not include buying a home or land...they want business investment. And how would you get a donkey on a plane?!

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    1. Wow. That's certainly a jaw dropper. Thanks for the info.

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  17. I hear much of Idaho is nice, but especially if you're a Republican. πŸ˜‰

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  18. Both Montana & Wyoming are wonderful, with probably more picturesque seasons than you get in NM usually. I like Virginia especially. Some great areas, Justina probably has told you. South Carolina is very affordable, not yet industrialized & suburban-ized everywhere, but the humidity in the Carolinas lasts a loooong time & is (for me, anyway) paralyzing. We're moving to VA next spring, House-Sale Gods willing -- I plan to land next door to somebody with donkeys & horses & be their new best friend.

    Another necessity you didn't mention on your list is medical care acceptably nearby, for you & animals. When you're 70-something & possibly a tiny tad more rickety, how long do you want to drive to the doc? Ditto 4-footed pals. Different for everyone. (I have a couple years on you, so I ponder that one.)

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  19. Do you mind cold, snowy winters? I had thought about suggesting Montana but I didn't think you'd like the winters. Kalispell, Missoula, Lolo, and my favorite is a little town called Darby but I suspect the winters are rough there. Salmon, Idaho is also a favorite of mine, but not sure where the nearest airport is. I live in north central Idaho and I LOVE it here. But the grazing is a bit too green for donkeys. And then redneck mentality is noticeable. Check out Moscow, Idaho - it's an open-minded, cute little city. The next town over, Troy, is pretty cute too. Or Palouse, Wa. All these places have snow but maybe not more than you're used to.

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    1. Long, cold, snowy winters are probably a dealbreaker, but I will check out Moscow and Troy. Thanks.

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    2. I live in Montana and looking to relocate all my goats, sheep and horses to a WARMER climate. If it was just me and no outside animals, then no problem. Last winter 2016/2017 nearly killed my mini horse and my old goat. It is not a good place for aging outside animals unless have want a heated barn for those horrible cold snaps and you will get them. Outside animals ears freeze off, cats, horses, donkeys etc. Just too cold for outside animals unless they are young.

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  20. I also want to give a recommendtion for the Western Slope area of Colorado, Grand Junction area including pretty Palisades or even the more remote Montrose or Gateway (check out this place http://www.colorado.com/resort/gateway-canyons, a hidden gem), offer inexpensive land, gorgeous views by the Colorado River, Rocky Mountains and red canyonlands, nearby Grand Junction airport which is more of a regional airport, but it does connect to Denver or Las Vegas with regularity. My daughter oved there last October and is very please with the small town with all amenities clse to fruit and vineyards and multiple recreational opportunities.

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  21. Show Low has a lot of snow in winter. That area also has had wildfires. We vacation up there about every 2 years, in Overgaard, which is about an hour from Show Low. There is a big Mormon community in Snowflake and that area looks a lot like where you live now...high desert, up on a plateau. It has pronghorns.

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  22. Well, since I don't suppose I can entice you to Vancouver Island BC Canada (mild climate, beautiful, but may not meet your other criteria), I'm going to second the recommendations for eastern or east central Washington. Having spent a lot of time in the Moses Lake/Ephrata area in my former life, I can certainly see it as a potential next step for you. Besides, with both you and Evensong in that area, I might well have a good reason for a return visit. Unless, of course, your possibly-next-President builds a wall along the northern border too. :)

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    1. Hahaha! I just posted about Moses Lake!

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  23. Yet another vote for East Tennessee.
    Our local NBC affiliate made this a few years ago.
    Short and sweet, but doesn't begin to scratch the surface.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uGZjks-dRE

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  24. I'd totally lobby for Moses Lake, WA....it is hot in the summertime, but we don't get much snow at all in the winter (we have lived here for 6 years now and have only had to shovel snow 2 of those years...one of them we didn't see a single flake!). It is "civilization" in that there are about 20,000 people here, and there are cities within a few hours in any direction, but there is LOTS of space and acreage in between.

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  25. Wow it's interesting to see where your pins are. Living in Texas and I make several trips to the Hill Country a years I can attest to the beauty of the area. They do have drought and flash flooding but you just have to have a good realtor that can direct you to the right area to avoid any major problems with the flooding. I was surprised at the number of pins in Washington State and Oregon. Good luck on your search and decision making.

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