Wednesday, July 16, 2014

What, me worry?

Just before I went to bed Monday night, I e-mailed the hay man with the good news that it hadn't rained all day, 
the radar was clear of ominous storms, and he should have no trouble getting his truck 
and my 300 bales of hay here on Tuesday morning.

Two hours later, I woke up to the sound of rain on the roof. Then the lightning started. 
Then the power went out. Then it rained – and I worried – all night long.

I called the hay man at 6:30 a.m. with the news. The hay was already loaded and this was the only day 
he could deliver it. I drove out to the highway to check the depth of the mud. I didn't get stuck. 
I called him back and told him he could probably make it, as long as the forecast for 
"60% chance of heavy rain before noon" didn't happen.

Then he started on his journey and I worried for another three hours. 
I hate hate hate worrying, but at times like these, what else is there to do?

Go outside and take pictures in the fog.



At least the rain had stopped and the power had come back on.



Johnny came with me while I tried to find Lucy and the boys.



I looked high, Johnny looked low.




We never found them...




...but I finally stopped worrying. Nature is a powerful elixir. I need to take it more often.




The fog lifted, the hay man arrived safely, and I couldn't stop smiling.




The hay barn is full and that's one less thing to worry about for an entire year.



26 comments:

  1. i am now wondering how many trucks it would take to haul all the food i eat in one year... glad he did not get stuck... that fog is an awesome shot

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anne Boleyn7/16/14, 4:45 AM

    Wears me out just thinking about all that hay!

    ReplyDelete
  3. A fully loaded hay truck is an awesome sight. I imagine the sweet smell of fresh hay. Three cheers for the hay man!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Bet when the hay truck rolled in, the herd found YOU!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Wow! Now that's a load of hay. Did Hay-Man bring a Hay-Helper ?

    The herd should have been lined up at the fence drooling :)

    We finally got rain here in NC last night .. a small relief.
    No watering the gardens last night or this morning.

    M in NC

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The hay man did bring a hay helper...thank goodness! I helped, too, but they stacked 4 for every one of mine.

      Delete
  6. You may not have found them, but I bet the boys found YOU when that hay rolled in. Hope Mom and baby Pronghorn are well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mama and Junior are still in residence. I'll do a proper update soon.

      Delete
  7. I love that saying "Don't worry be Happy". Easier said than done!
    Glad everything worked out well for you and the barn is full for the winter.
    BA SP

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ahh the smell of fresh hay. It's so much work but, ya feel soooo good when it's done. Great shots of your Mountain Lion JCC.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Do you buy local hay? What does a ton of hay cost you ....(averages are fine).....thinking of moving out your way from the north east coast.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This hay was hauled in from central Texas - bermuda coastal, average weight about 50 pounds, $11 per bale but that includes delivery to the middle of nowhere.

      Delete
  10. Beautiful pics! I think in that first one you can just barely see the zombies from Walking Dead: right, Danni?
    Glad all is well that ends well :-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Beautiful hay. The herd would like a poster to hang where they can see it year round, actually. You certainly don't want to wish away the rain. Glad it turned out well. The pictures are fabulous.

    ReplyDelete
  12. That looked like a great hay load. We have our barn full also and it's always a relief. We get the big round bales, but every year there is concern if it will be a good hay year and how high the price will go. Once it's in, it's one less concern out of the way.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Couldn't they do a smaller truck ?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Whew, just reading the first paragraph made my stomach clench. A barn full of hay is certainly something to smile (and worry) over.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Holy Christian Bale! I had no idea when you said hay, you meant HAY! No more hay worrying for you. Great shots of Johnny, the tiny mountain lion. Boy, does his fur stand on end. Happy hump day.

    ReplyDelete
  16. We used to get bales of soil mix. It came on pallets and we used a forklift but it still took us a long time to unload a truck. I can't even imagine time and work it took to unload this.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Well! The weather was MUCH nicer the last time the hay man came.
    :-)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Yikes... that's a big truck for your..erm... "road".... maybe two smaller loads could work too... but, I suppose time is money and it would cost even more. Wow.$11 a bale is a lot...my sister is complaint at $6.. and, finally found some better stuff with no alfalfa in it for $5 ..so was ecstatic ...her horse can't eat alfalfa ... man, some of these horses come with finicky insides....

    ReplyDelete
  19. what a beautiful hay truck! I dont eat hay but seeing this truck makes me feel happy! from Texas, that is far! Mini mountain lion looks gorgeous in the fog

    ReplyDelete
  20. Love the fog pics and esp the thought of two cow boyish looking men pitching hay bales :-)

    ReplyDelete
  21. An American in Tokyo7/16/14, 6:40 PM

    YAY!! The hay man arriveth!! =D

    ReplyDelete
  22. An American in Tokyo7/16/14, 6:41 PM

    Just wondering...is Fish doing okay?!

    ReplyDelete
  23. That is one heck of a lot of hay! So glad it all turned out as well as it did.

    ReplyDelete