Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Homestead on the range

Yesterday when I posted about the history of this land, I figured you'd all head for the hills out of boredom. What a delight to see that many of you found it as fascinating as I do! Cool!

Here's the video from the tour Lucy and I took of what I think is the original Garner homestead.

p.s. Many of you asked how I was able to find the 1921 survey markers. It was actually very easy. They're located along the section lines, which is where many of the old barbed wire fences around here were built. They stick up from the ground about a foot in most places. I noticed them when I first moved here but never bothered to read what they said until now.


22 comments:

  1. Wow! I found yesterday's, and today's, posts fascinating! What fun to research and find the who, what, where of your land and your area.

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  2. Wonderful video. Love it through the ears of Lucy. I couldn't imagine living back then, i like my running water too much.

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  3. Man, I LOVE this kind of stuff. Thanks Linda for your willingness to steward this historical site. If only they had left a written record of their time there. Looking forward to more....

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  4. It was definitely a harder lifestyle back then. We sometimes trail ride by an old house that is tumbling down and caved in. Every time I see it I wonder who lived there, what their dreams were, and what eventually happened for them to leave it.

    Thanks for giving us the tour. Loved it!

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  5. To see how people survived on these homesteads in New Mexico, you might like the book Pie Town Woman by Joan Myers. It is illustrated with photos by Russell Lee, who documented the Great Depression for the Farm Security Administration. You can read about it here: http://www.joanmyers.com/Ptbk.htm

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  6. Anne Boleyn8/21/12, 6:35 AM

    Thank you for taking us with you. I remember my brother taking me to some much more ancient ruins a few miles from where he lives in Patagonia AZ. He had told me that he was taking me to church,
    There IS something sacred about the remains of people's lives when you look at them this way.

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  7. Wow!~This is very INTERESTING! I'm going to do a post on my blog about the original house of one of my ancestors, so come on over and read it!

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  8. I find this stuff very interesting. When I was young(long time ago) I thought I might like to be an archeologist. So all your explorations are right up my alley.

    It's fun to dig up the past.

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  9. Very very interesting!!!!
    If all of us on this planet had an good attitude of stewardship our environment would be a lot happier eh.......

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  10. Estella from Co.8/21/12, 7:44 AM

    Sure did enjoy the video and the Longears of Lovely Lucy. What tough people back then, can't imagine even having what we call CLEAN clothes. Dust storms, lack of water, extreme temps. and eating off the land (hope they liked rabbit and snake). Thank you so much for sharing, I also find this very interesting. Hugs to all

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  11. Well if you ever have some hours to rub together while in ABQ, you might want to try the old ABQ main library on Central it is now the heritage collection....which includes all kinds of land records from all over the state. We found plots for the Tecolote Land grant of which hubby has 33 acres passed down to him. Old railroad records and all manner of yummy things that history buffs and keepers of the NM story drool over. We even got a copy of the 1878 railroad survey that is on our land. Cool stuff.
    I am so excited to read this about your piece of NM. And of all the silly things to cry over but I am, it is so important what you are collecting and recording yourself. Stewards indeed, we all should be. For what will the future know of those that have come before us if we don't do that for them.

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  12. Beautiful! The video actually gave me the shivers - like the spirits of the Garners were right there with you...in a happy, content sort of way.

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  13. Enjoying your history tour VERY much! Here in North Mississippi I've taken walks around the country near our home and found long abandoned houses, weathering away, and tried to imagine the family that called it home and lived through our hot, humid summers (no a/c), and tried to eke a living, probably as farmers. I find it all fascinating...so happy that YOU do too!!

    A wonderful video through Lucy's beautiful ears!

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  14. Carol in N. Colorado8/21/12, 8:30 AM

    Thank you for the history lesson. I find it so interesting. To think that our ancestors raised large families in small homes. Many not surviving, but to dig a life out of an area with little to no vegetation, little water, not much in the way of game and survive. today, we have people living in large homes with smaller families and wanting more space. I for one can't wait for the next installment!!

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  15. You might try going to Ancestry.com and looking up the homesteader's names. There are message boards for various surnames where you can post questions.
    What a hard life they had.

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  16. Really enjoyed your blog and Lucy!

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  17. I'm so glad to hear that there was a railroad nearby. I was wondering how they got supplies. (thinking about your tire sucking trips to Walmart) Wonder if Irene decorated that little stone house, if she smiled everyday.
    Maybe you could go to the tax assessor's office and work backwards. Who owned it before you, and before them, etc.

    Wonder if Irene could even imagine 2012 and that a brave woman would be riding a donkey around her house?

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  18. What fun and thank you! Love the ears too. I too wonder when I see old buildings, houses, foundations what is was like way back then. Loving this history stuff.

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  19. I'm in for more history from your area....Love reading the posts and the great video with comments below....Thanks for sharing your part of NM with me...Love driving thru NM the few times I came across the country by car....
    Love from NC

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  20. There was a old house on our property in central Texas...Love to look for old junk....My favorites are the 14 horseshoes in various sizes and some old tools and pieces of tools...I collect all the broken glass and put in old mason jars....also found 5 or 6marbles....Love your posts...Thank you for letting me enjoy them...Also thanks for turning me on to Don Estorbo and Maru...

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  21. With the music, your video is, well, rather poignant. It's a gem -- and what a treasure you have on your land (the walk? and the well? both still visible? very cool).

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